Spaghetti with Kimchi

When a friend recently mentioned that his son adds left-over kimchi to his spaghetti, it sounded so good that I wanted to try it myself. I must say that I have cooked and enjoyed Korean food mostly in the traditional ways, but lately I’ve had a growing interest in fusion dishes. The inspiration comes from all the hype surrounding Korean fusion dishes such as Korean BBQ tacos, kimchi quesadillas, hamburgers and hot dogs.

For my Italian/Korean fusion dish, I decided to make a tomato based sauce with kimchi flavor. I used pork belly which always goes well with kimchi, but Italian sausage or pancetta would work well too. To build more depth into the flavor, I added anchovies, a common ingredient in both Italian and Korean cuisines. The flavor combination worked really well as I had hoped. The kimchi added a unique spiciness to the sauce without overpowering it. It was easy to make but still so delicious! This will be perfect for a quick week-night meal.

Ingredients:
1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes with basil (if not available, add a few fresh basil leaves)
4 ounces fresh pork belly, finely chopped
3/4 cup well-fermented kimchi, finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
4 anchovy fillets, finely chopped
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon dried oregano
Salt and pepper

1 pound spaghetti

2 scallions, coarsely chopped

Grated parmesan cheese

Season the pork belly with salt and pepper and set aside. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the pork to the pan and cook until lightly brown. Add kimchi and sauté for 4 minutes. Mix in crushed tomatoes, anchovies, and oregano. Simmer sauce over medium-low heat until thickened, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Cook pasta in boiling salted water until al dente. Drain and return to the pot. Add the sauce and scallions and toss to combine over low heat for 2 minutes. Sprinkle grated cheese on top. Serve immediately.

Leave a Comment

*

Comments

  1. Wow! That looks amazing, really amazing! I love Korean food but I’ve never had pasta with a Korean twist. I’m pretty sure I will love your rendition of this dish. It’s got anchovies and belly pork plus kimchi?!?!? I’m totally sold 😀 Great post and again, an amazing recipe. Saved for trying.Thanks for sharing.

  2. Anyonghaseyo says:

    Living in Hawaii, kimchee is a must at each meal. Living in such a diverse society, we are lucky to enjoy the best of each culture and we embrace it wholeheartedly. We can just have kimchee, rice and korean nori and be totally satisfied. It doesn’t take much to enjoy a delicious meal. Every few months, my two cousins and I get together at my younger cousin’s house and we have a marathon k-drama night where we watch from 1:00pm to 12:00 midnight. Of course we have snacks and dinner in between. I will make the kalbi Jim for our next gathering. It am am sure they will love it. I will let you know how iit turns out. Kamsamida!

    • oh that sounds like so much fun! I want to come over. I am sure your cousins will love your galbijjim. Come back and let me know how was the party and the food. Cheers!

  3. Carol Lindwall says:

    I came across your recipe for Japchae on the Daily Meal many months ago. I was attracted to it because I am allergic to all grains. I am always looking for noodles that are grain-free. Sweet potato starch noodles sounded great! I went to the Asian Grocery in our area, not knowing if I could find them. After looking down a long aisle of noodles (both sides of the aisle), and finding no such noodles, I decided to wander randomly down the aisles. I prayed that God would send a clerk who could locate these noodles. About four aisles down, I saw a man arranging merchandise on the top of the shelf. I asked him where I could find these noodles. He climbed down the ladder, turned around right behind where he was standing, leaned over and picked up a bag of the sweet potato starch noodles! Amazing! I made the Japchae. The only thing that I did differently was to buy two 1/4 thick slices of deli roast beef from the deli counter (instead of buying raw meat), making sure that the beef was cooked through and not rare. I sliced the beef into thin strips before stir-frying it. The recipe was very good. I got three large servings out of it. When my daughter came for Christmas, she and I made it together. Then she went home and made it for her roommates. The second time she made it, she served it to her Korean foreign exchange student, who gave the dish the thumbs up! Thanks for a great dish! Carol Lindwall

    • So happy to hear you were able to find the noodles! How nice you made the dish with your daughter over Christmas and she ended up making it for her roommates and her Korean students. Thank you so much for sharing the stories with me!!! Happy Korean cooking!