Korean Bapsang http://www.koreanbapsang.com a Korean mom's home cooking Wed, 19 Aug 2015 05:13:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 Korean Temple Food and Hobak Mandu http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/08/korean-temple-foohobak-mandu-dumplings.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/08/korean-temple-foohobak-mandu-dumplings.html#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 04:37:31 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3329 I recently had the opportunity to interview with a Korean TV network, BTN – Buddhist Television Network. BTN sent a team of four people to travel and film a documentary about Korean temple cuisine in different parts of America. They asked me if I could make some temple dishes and share my thoughts on the […]

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Zucchini dumplings

I recently had the opportunity to interview with a Korean TV network, BTN – Buddhist Television Network. BTN sent a team of four people to travel and film a documentary about Korean temple cuisine in different parts of America. They asked me if I could make some temple dishes and share my thoughts on the food and cooking style. I had a great time cooking and filming a small part of the program while sharing the dishes with the friendly crew.

zucchini dumplings

Temple food has been increasingly popular in and outside Korea by health conscious people, as well-being, healing food regardless of religious backgrounds. I was very glad to have this opportunity to learn more about it.

While there is so much to talk about the 1700-year-old Korean temple food (사찰음식), here are five basic things you should know:

  1. Korean temple food excludes all animal products. Milk is allowed, so temple food as a whole is not vegan while most of individual dishes are. Temple cooking is primarily based on seasonal plant-based ingredients, which are either organically grown in temple grounds or harvested from nearby fields and mountains.  
  2. There are 5 forbidden vegetables, called oshinchae (오신채). They are garlic, scallion, onion, buchu (부추) – garlic chives, and dalrae (달래) – wild rocambole/small wild onion. These vegetables are considered stimulants which hinder spiritual meditation.  
  3. Temple dishes are lightly seasoned only with natural seasonings, so they generally have a mild, clean taste. Temple cooking uses a wide variety of natural flavor enhancers such as mushroom powder, lotus root powder, perilla seeds, etc. as well as temple made Korean traditional fermented condiments such as soy sauce (aka jib ganjang/soup soy sauce), doenjang (soybean paste) and gochujang (red chili pepper paste).
  4. Because they have to work with limited ingredients, temple cooks are experts on identifying edible wild plants, creating many different dishes with limited ingredients, and preserving/pickling vegetables when they are in season for later use.  
  5. In Buddhist temples, cooking and eating is considered spiritual meditation. The food is made with care to nourish the body, mind, and soul of those who eat it. Food is considered medicine. 

zucchini dumplings

This dumpling recipe made with summer zucchini was recently featured on BTN as a favorite summer dish at Bongnyeongsa, the oldest temple in Suwon, Gyeonggi-do. I was totally intrigued by the simplicity of this recipe, which was made with only 2 filling ingredients, one of which is actually optional. Bongnyeongsa boils these dumplings, cools in cold water, and serves cold.

Let me tell you — what a refreshing change this was from my usual mandu recipes which involve several filling ingredients and lots of chopping and squeezing! It is so easy to make, guys! The best part of it is the nice and clean taste which allows you to simply savor the natural flavor of the sweet summer zucchini. The mushroom complements the zucchini with a bit of earthy flavor and meaty texture.

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All the tableware shown in the final photos of this post are sponsored by Huue Craft, an online store dedicated to the finest Korean pottery tableware. They ship worldwide to over 25 countries. Visit Huue Craft online store for the beautiful tableware created by five of the renowned potters in Korea!

Hobak Mandu (Zucchini Dumplings)
Serves 4
Incredibly simple Korean dumplings made with summer zucchini
Print
Ingredients
  1. 24 dumpling wrappers
  2. 2 zucchinis (about 10 ounces each)
  3. 2 teaspoons salt
  4. 4 dried shittaki mushrooms, soaked (or use fresh) - optional
  5. ½ soup soy sauce (or ¼ salt)
  6. sesame oil
Instructions
  1. Cut the zucchinis into thin disks and then into matchsticks. If the disks are big, cut in half before cutting into matchsticks. Sprinkle with 2 teaspoons of the salt, and let sit for about 15 minutes until wilted and some liquid is released. Gently squeeze the liquid out from the zucchini.
    zucchini dumplings
  2. Cut the mushrooms into thin strips. If the mushrooms are thick, slice them diagonally once or twice as if you are butterflying the mushrooms, and then cut into thin strips. Mix with the soup soy sauce (or salt) and a little bit (about ½ teaspoon) sesame oil.
    hobak mandu
  3. Heat a pan over high heat, and add two teaspoons of sesame oil and the zucchini. Stir fry until the zucchini is cooked and dry. Transfer to a large plate and spread it around to cool.
    zucchini dumplings
  4. Heat a pan over medium high heat, and stir fry the mushrooms for 2 minutes. Add a tablespoon or two of water or mushroom soaked water if the pan gets too dry.
    hobak mandu
  5. Combine the zucchini and mushrooms. Adjust the seasoning to taste if needed.
    zucchini dumplings
  6. Place one heaping teaspoonful of the filling on a wrapper placed on your palm. Wet the edges of the wrapper with water, fold the wrapper and seal tightly (pushing the air out with your fingers) into a half-moon shape. You can pinch one side of the wrapper to form pleats. Repeat this process until all the filling/wrappers are used.
    zucchini dumplings
  7. Bring a pot of water to a boil. Add the dumplings a few at a time, stirring gently so they don’t stick to the bottom of the pot. Cook only until the dumplings come up to the surface. Prepare a bowl with cold water. Remove the dumplings quickly, and plunge in the cold water to cool.
    zucchini dumplings
  8. Remove and serve cold with a dipping sauce (2 teaspoons soy sauce, 1 teaspoon vinegar, and 2 teaspoons water) if desired.
Notes
  1. To make the square dumpling shape, wet the edges, pinch the opposite sides of the wrapper and seal the edges. Do the same with the other two sides. Make sure to seal the middle tightly.
  2. Regardless of the shape, make sure to seal tightly as the dumplings will be boiled.
Adapted from Bongnyeongsa Temple Recipe
Adapted from Bongnyeongsa Temple Recipe
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KCON 2015 Los Angeles http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/08/kcon-2015-los-angeles.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/08/kcon-2015-los-angeles.html#comments Sun, 09 Aug 2015 17:03:58 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3274 Last weekend, I was in Los Angeles, California for KCON 2015! I held two cooking workshops on tasty Korean street food — tteokbokki and mini gimbap. This was my second year at KCON, and I felt incredibly fortunate and honored to be part of the bigger and better event this year. It was truly an […]

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KCON 2015 LA

Last weekend, I was in Los Angeles, California for KCON 2015! I held two cooking workshops on tasty Korean street food — tteokbokki and mini gimbap. This was my second year at KCON, and I felt incredibly fortunate and honored to be part of the bigger and better event this year. It was truly an experience of a lifetime!  So you’re wondering what KCON is? Here’s a good description by Billboard:

“For the fourth year in a row, KCON hit the Los Angeles area for America’s annual Mecca of Korean culture. This year, the now-three-day convention boasted a Comic Con-like setup of panels, booths, workshops and vendors about all things Korean culture (or “Hallyu”) at the Los Angeles Convention Center before wrapping things up with a concert on the latter two days at the Staples Center.”

After checking into the hotel on Thursday, I didn’t waste any time and went to Koreatown for a late lunch. I was in LA, the best city in America for Korean food, and determined to take advantage of this every chance I got.

On Friday, the KCON convention began. I didn’t have a workshop that day, but I went to the convention center to check things out. I loved this year’s indoor location. It was nice,  cool, and spacious. On the main floor, there were so many booths for fun activities and merchandise. Look at these guys showing off chopstick skills, and grinding beans in a traditional stone grinder.

KCON 2015

I also met some awesome people!  

KCON 2015 LA

KCON 2015 LA

The panels and workshops were being held upstairs. In Room 518, where I’d have my cooking workshops, the tables were nicely set up for 100 people. It looked a bit intimidating to me, so I kept telling myself “you can do it”!

KCON 2015 LA

We got there early Saturday morning for my 11 a.m. workshop. We made some tteokbokki in advance, and set up little hands-on stations at each table for the attendees to try rolling gimbap. The word on the streets was that so many people were lining up outside the room.

A few minutes before 11 a.m., the room was completely filled with Korean food enthusiasts. The only problem was that the room wasn’t big enough for everyone to get in. Sorry if you couldn’t make it in!  

The audience loved the gimbap rolling activity! Also, one of the attendees came up to me afterwards, and she said the ttoekbokki we made in class was the best one she’s had in America (and she had it quite a few times). I was ecstatic to hear that!

I learned from the first workshop that we would need to cook more food in advance so everyone can have a taste. I also needed to buy a lot more ingredients since there were many more people than I expected.

KCON 2015

That evening, I had the amazing opportunity to film a video with Buzzfeedthe Try Guys. I taught them how to make tteokbokki and mini gimbap. It was so much fun! The guys were actually pretty good cooks, but to three of them, Korean food was new. We made two batches of tteokbokki while recording, and they were both devoured by the time we finished. The guys asked me if I wanted to be the Try Mom– how sweet!

KCON 2015

It was a full house again the next day. 

KCON 2015 LA

For both days, I had the most attentive and engaged audiences, which made my job so much easier and way more fun! They rolled their gimbap very well, and asked a lot of good questions. How do you make vegetarian tteokbokki? How do you make tteokbokki extra spicy? How do you reheat tteokbokki? Do you need to cool the rice before using it to make gimbap? What are the proteins that can be used in mini gimbap? And more….

KCON 2015 LA

At the end, I had some quiz questions for the audience, and gave out a small package of gim (nori) as a prize for answering each question. Also, while I was shopping at a Korean market in LA, I discovered a little Korean snack called ssal tteokbokki, which is a bag of tteokbokki flavored rice chips. I thought it would be cute and fitting to send the attendees off  with a little tteokbokki love, so we went around all over K-town to buy as many as we could.

KCON 2015 LA

Then, of course, the photos! I was extremely grateful to see such a long line of people that wanted to come up for the meet and greet with me. Send any photos my way!

KCON 2015 LA

The workshops were very successful, thanks again to the awesome audience! I also want to thank my four person squad (Chris, Issamu, Jae and Young) that helped me in and outside the workshop room, moving things between the hotel and the convention center, running to Korean markets, prepping the ingredients, etc.  And my daughter who discussed this event with me for months, gave me so many fun ideas, and was there with me in spirit. I couldn’t have done it myself!

KCON 2015 LA

My visit to LA could not have been complete without visiting Santa Monica Beach. My tired feet loved the “sand massage” and the cold Pacific water! I felt totally refreshed afterwards thanks to my brother living in Santa Monica!

We wrapped up our LA trip with the K-pop concert at the Staples Center – the main event of KCON 2015! I may have been one of the oldest people at the concert, but I really enjoyed it!

Finally, I’ll leave you with this 4-minute recap video released by KCON.

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Yangnyeom Gejang (Spicy Raw Crabs) http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/07/yangnyeom-gejang-spicy-raw-crabs.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/07/yangnyeom-gejang-spicy-raw-crabs.html#comments Mon, 27 Jul 2015 02:13:08 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3234 Yangnyeom gejang (양념게장) is a spicy marinated raw crab dish. As I mentioned in my ganjang gejang (간장게장) recipe, gejang (게장) is a traditional dish that used to be marinated in a very salty soy sauce brine as a way of preserving the crabs for a long time. These days, the crabs are lightly preserved, […]

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Spicy marinated raw crabs

Yangnyeom gejang (양념게장) is a spicy marinated raw crab dish. As I mentioned in my ganjang gejang (간장게장) recipe, gejang (게장) is a traditional dish that used to be marinated in a very salty soy sauce brine as a way of preserving the crabs for a long time. These days, the crabs are lightly preserved, in either a mild soy sauce-based brine (ganjang gejang) or in a spicy sauce (yangnyeom gejang), to be consumed within a few days.

In Korea, there are numerous gejang specialty restaurants serving both types of gejang, but we are not as lucky here in the U.S. You may have seen this dish served as part of the side dish (banchan) spread at some Korean restaurants in the U.S. It’s not that common, so my family considers it a real treat when we see it at a restaurant.

Spicy marinated raw crabs

Female crabs with roe are preferred by Koreans for making gejang because seasoned crab roe is delicious! In Korea, gejang quality is partially determined by the amount of roe and tomalley in the crabs. It’s icing on the cake! Of course, you can also use male crabs. The most important thing is to buy the freshest crabs. Freezing them will help with cleaning. Clean the crabs very well under running water.

spicy raw crabs

Making the spicy version is fairly simple. Prepare the seasoning (yangnyeom), clean the crabs, and mix with the seasoning. For ganjang gejang, the whole crabs are soaked in a soy brine. On the other hand, for yangnyeom gejang, the crabs are opened and cut into pieces before being marinated, for the sauce to coat and penetrate the crab meat.

This slightly sweet, salty, spicy marinated crab dish will certainly live up to its reputation for being a “rice thief” (밥도둑). Be ready to enjoy with lots of rice!

Spicy raw crabs

Yangnyeom Gejang (Spicy Raw Crabs)
Serves 4
Raw crabs marinated in a slightly sweet, salty, spicy Korean sauce
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3 medium or 4 small blue crabs (or kkotge, 꽃게)
Seasoning
  1. 3 tablespoons gochugaru, 고추가루 (or more to taste)
  2. 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  3. 1 tablespoon soup soy sauce, guk ganjang, 국간장 - or use 1/2 teaspoon salt
  4. 2 tablespoons rice wine
  5. 2 tablespoons corn syrup, 올리고당
  6. 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  7. 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  8. 2 teaspoons finely grated (juiced) ginger
  9. 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  10. 1 scallion, finely chopped
Instructions
  1. Put the live crabs in the freezer for an hour or two (longer is fine as well).
  2. Combine all the seasoning ingredients and mix well. The seasoning can be prepared a day or two in advance. It will further develop flavor as it sits.
    Spicy raw crabs
  3. Plunge the frozen crabs in cold water to thaw. Separate the top shell and remove the gills. Clean the shell part of the crab thoroughly, with a kitchen brush or a toothbrush, under running water.
    marinated raw crabs
  4. Break (or cut) the body in half (or quarters). You can cut off the sharp end of each small leg with a pair of kitchen scissors if preferred. Drain well in a colander in the fridge. It’s important to minimize the time that the crabs are out at room temperature.
    marinated raw crabs
  5. Combine the crabs and seasoning, and toss to coat well. Spoon some sauce into the top shells. Marinate for a few hours at least or up to a couple of days in the fridge. These spicy crabs are best eaten within a couple of days.
    spicy raw crabs
Notes
  1. You can add some chopped onion and/or chili pepper to the seasoning sauce. Also, you can add 1 tablespoon of Korean plum syrup (maesil chung, 매실청), or 2 tablespoons of grated pear or apple for some fruity sweetness with a hint of acidity.
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Dak Kalguksu (Chicken Noodle Soup) http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/06/dak-kalguksu-chicken-noodle-soup.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/06/dak-kalguksu-chicken-noodle-soup.html#comments Sun, 28 Jun 2015 15:59:03 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3197 It’s been extremely hot and humid here! I previously mentioned the Korean idea of cooling off and boosting energy with boiling hot chicken soups, such as samgyetang (ginseng chicken soup) and dak gomtang (chicken soup). Add this dak kalguksu (닭칼국수) to the list! Kalguksu (칼국수) means “knife noodles”, but it actually refers to a steaming hot […]

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Korean chicken noodle soup

It’s been extremely hot and humid here! I previously mentioned the Korean idea of cooling off and boosting energy with boiling hot chicken soups, such as samgyetang (ginseng chicken soup) and dak gomtang (chicken soup). Add this dak kalguksu (닭칼국수) to the list!

Kalguksu (칼국수) means “knife noodles”, but it actually refers to a steaming hot noodle soup that’s traditionally made with handmade, knife-cut noodles. There are many variations using different ingredients for the soup base or for the dough. Dak (chicken) kalguksu is made with a rich chicken broth, and shredded chicken meat.

Korean chicken noodle soup

You can certainly use commercially packaged fresh kalguksu noodles available in the refrigerated section of Korean markets. However, making noodles at home without a machine is not that difficult! You can make them at a moment’s notice as long as you have flour and salt! Homemade noodles taste so much better, and obviously they are much cheaper. A bit of oil makes the dough silkier and a little easier to work with, but it’s not absolutely necessary. The noodles are typically parboiled in a separate pot before adding to the chicken broth. This is strongly recommended because the soup can get very thick from all the starch the noodles release while cooking.

Dak kalguksu is typically made with a whole chicken. It’s a cheap way to feed more people, not to mention the stock will be more flavorful. You can cut up a whole chicken before boiling if you want it to cook a little faster. If you want to use cut chicken pieces, leg quarters and chicken wings will be good for a flavorful stock. The soup is made similar to dak gomtang. Simply boil the chicken, with some aromatic vegetables, to make a flavorful broth, and shred the meat to use as a topping. Typical kalguksu also includes julienned or sliced vegetables such as onion, zucchini, carrot, and/or potato.

Kalguksu is delicious with baechu geotjeori (fresh kimchi)!

handmade noodles

handmade noodles

All the tableware shown in the final photos of this post are sponsored by Huue Craft, an online store dedicated to the finest Korean pottery tableware. They ship worldwide to over 25 countries. Visit Huue Craft online store for the beautiful tableware created by five of the renowned potters in Korea!

Dak Kalguksu (Korean Chicken Noodle Soup)
Serves 4
Delicious noodle soup made with fresh noodles and a rich chicken broth
Print
For the soup
  1. 1 small whole chicken (2.5 to 3 pounds), or bone-in pieces
  2. ½ medium onion
  3. 8 plump garlic cloves
  4. 3 to 4 thinly sliced ginger pieces
  5. 2 white parts of scallions
  6. 1 3-inch square dried kelp - optional
  7. 1/4 medium onion, thinly sliced
  8. 1 tablespoon soup soy sauce
For the chicken meat
  1. 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  2. 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  3. salt (about 1/2 teaspoon) and pepper to taste
For the vegetables
  1. 1 medium zucchini, julienned
  2. 2 scallions, finely chopped
For the noodles
  1. 1 package fresh kalguksu noodles or see below for homemade
For the sauce (Yangnyumjang) - Optional
  1. 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  2. 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  3. 1 teaspoon Korean red pepper flakes (gochugaru)
  4. 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
  5. 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  6. 2 – 3 scallions, finely chopped
For the homemade noodles
  1. 3 cups all-purpose flour
  2. 3/4 teaspoon salt
  3. 1 tablespoon vegetable or canola oil
  4. 1 cup water
Instructions
  1. Place the cleaned chicken in a stockpot large enough to hold the chicken and 12 cups of water. Add the onion, garlic, ginger, scallions, and 12 cups water. Bring it to a boil over medium high heat. Skim off any foam on top. Reduce the heat to medium low and simmer, covered, for about 40 minutes. Adjust cooking time for cut pieces of chicken. If making homemade noodles, this is a good time to start making the dough.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  2. Sprinkle the julienned zucchini with salt for about 15 minutes and then squeeze out the water. Briefly saute in a heated pan with a little bit of oil. Set aside.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  3. Cut through the thickest part of the breast, with a knife, to see if the chicken is cooked and tender. Turn the heat off and carefully remove the chicken.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  4. When the chicken is cool enough to handle, remove the meat off the bones. Shred the meat into small bite size pieces. Add the garlic, salt and pepper to the chicken. Combine well.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  5. Strain the broth and remove the excess fat. You can line the strainer with a paper towel or use a fat separator.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  6. Return the broth back to the pot. Add the optional dried kelp, onion slices, and soup soy sauce. Bring it to a boil and boil for a few minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste. Remove the kelp. This is a good point to roll the dough out and make the noodles if making homemade noodles.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  7. Meanwhile, in another pot, boil water to parboil the noodles. Add the noodles, and stir. Cook briefly.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  8. Remove the noodles with a strainer and add to the pot with the broth. Continue to boil until the noodles are cooked through.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  9. To serve, ladle the noodles and soup in a serving bowl, top with the chicken pieces, zucchini, and chopped scallion.
For the homemade noodles
  1. Mix the flour, salt, oil and water by hand until the dough comes together. Generously flour the surface to knead. Knead with the heel of your hand until the dough is fairly smooth, about 7 to 8 minutes. The dough should feel slightly stiff. You can adjust the dough by kneading in a little more flour or more water (just enough to wet your hands). Cover with plastic wrap, and let it rest for 30 minutes to an hour. After resting, the dough should feel soft and smooth. You can prepare the dough up to this point a day in advance.
    Korean chicken noodle soup
  2. When ready to use, knead the dough for 2 to 3 minutes. Using a sharp knife, cut the dough into 2 pieces. Flatten a piece, and roll it out with a rolling pin to make a thin sheet, about 12 x 14-inch.
    Kalguksu
  3. From the longer side, fold the dough over 3 to 4 times into layers. Generously flour the surface, and the dough as you roll it out and fold to keep the dough from sticking.
    kalguksu recipe
  4. Cut the dough with a sharp knife into about 1/4-inch thickness. Unfold the noodles and dust with flour to keep the noodles strands separate.
    homemade noodles
Notes
  1. If you want make noodles for 2 to 3 servings, use 2 cups of flour, 1/2 teaspoon of salt, 2 teaspoons of oil, and 2/3 cup of water. Basically, the ratio is, for every cup of flour, you will need 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon oil, and 1/3 cup of water.
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Spicy Grilled Korean Chicken http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/06/spicy-grilled-korean-chicken.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/06/spicy-grilled-korean-chicken.html#comments Mon, 15 Jun 2015 03:56:38 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3140 Here’s another Korean BBQ option for your summer grilling! This spicy chicken bulgogi recipe is so flavorful, and I am confident that it will become one of your grill favorites. Not a spicy lover? Not to worry! I already have a mild version of this chicken bulgogi recipe, which, by the way, is one of […]

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Spicy Chicken Bulgogi

Here’s another Korean BBQ option for your summer grilling! This spicy chicken bulgogi recipe is so flavorful, and I am confident that it will become one of your grill favorites. Not a spicy lover? Not to worry! I already have a mild version of this chicken bulgogi recipe, which, by the way, is one of the most popular recipes on my blog.

The dark meat stands up better to the bold marinade in this recipe. Boneless thigh meat is my favorite chicken part for grilling. Its open, flat surface works well for marinating and grilling. In Korea, deboned drumstick meat is also popular for similar dishes. Keeping the skin is a matter of personal preference. 

Spicy grilled Korean chicken

As a sweetener for the marinade, I used Korean plum syrup called maesil chung (매실청) in addition to honey and sugar. It adds a bit of acidity and fruity sweetness to the dish. Other options are pineapple juice or lemon juice with a bit more sugar. Grated apple works well too. The marinade can be made 2 to 3 days in advance. Marinate the chicken overnight for best results.

On another subject, if you haven’t seen it yet, here’s the video of my first ever cable TV appearance! You can imagine how nerve-racking it was, but it was such an honor to be on a Korean cable network to share my stories about this blog, Korean food, and my readers.

Thanks for watching!

Spicy chicken bulgogi

 

Spicy Korean grilled chicken

All the tableware shown in the final photos of this post are sponsored by Huue Craft, an online store dedicated to the finest Korean pottery tableware. They ship worldwide to over 25 countries. Please visit Huue Craft online store and check out their beautiful tableware!

Spicy Grilled Korean Chicken
Serves 4
Chicken thighs marinated in a spicy, flavorful Korean marinade and grilled to perfection!
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 pounds boneless chicken thigh
For the marinade
  1. 3 tablespoons Korean red chili pepper flakes (gochugaru, 고추가루)
  2. 1 tablespoon sugar
  3. 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  4. 2 tablespoons rice wine (or white wine)
  5. 2 tablespoons Korean red chili pepper paste (gochujang, 고추장)
  6. 2 tablespoons honey (or 3 tablespoons corn syrup)
  7. 2 tablespoons maesil chung, 매실청 (or 2 to 3 tablespoons pineapple juice or grated apple)
  8. 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  9. 1/4 medium onion, grated (about 1/4 cup)
  10. 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  11. 1 tablespoon grated ginger
  12. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  13. pepper to taste
For the garnish
  1. 2 tablespoons chopped scallions for garnish
  2. 1 teaspoon sesame seeds for garnish
Instructions
  1. Rinse chicken pieces. Drain. Trim off excess fat. Cut each chicken thigh in half crosswise. Cut open any thick parts.
    spicy Korean grilled chicken
  2. Combine the marinade ingredients in a bowl and mix well.
    Spicy Korean grilled chicken
  3. Coat the chicken with the marinade. Marinate for a few hours (preferably overnight) in the refrigerator.
    Spicy Korean grilled chicken
  4. Preheat a lightly oiled grill over medium high heat. When hot, add the chicken pieces. Cook until cooked through and slightly caramelized, about 4 to 6 minutes each side. Reduce the heat if the chicken starts to burn. You can also cook the chicken indoor on a grill pan or in a skillet.
    Korean grilled spicy chicken
Notes
  1. Grill some vegetables such as onion, zucchini, and/or mushrooms. Simply cut up, toss with some sesame oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper before grilling. You will have an easy side dish to serve with the meat.
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Baechu Geotjeori (Fresh Kimchi) http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/06/baechu-geotjeori-fresh-kimchi.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/06/baechu-geotjeori-fresh-kimchi.html#comments Tue, 02 Jun 2015 03:59:08 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3111 Last month, I introduced a salad-like kimchi called geotjeori (겉절이) using baby bok choy. Geotjeori is basically a kimchi that’s made to be eaten fresh without fermentation. As such, the vegetables are lightly salted. Fresh kimchi goes especially well with dishes such as kalguksu (warm noodle soup) and Korean BBQ meat. Geotjeori is most commonly […]

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Fresh kimchi

Last month, I introduced a salad-like kimchi called geotjeori (겉절이) using baby bok choy. Geotjeori is basically a kimchi that’s made to be eaten fresh without fermentation. As such, the vegetables are lightly salted. Fresh kimchi goes especially well with dishes such as kalguksu (warm noodle soup) and Korean BBQ meat. Geotjeori is most commonly made with napa cabbage, baechu (배추). 

Summer napa cabbages tend to be small with thinner leaves, and it’s perfect for making baechu geotjeori. If you have a large cabbage, only use the inner tender parts. You can save tough outer leaves for baechu doenjang guk later.

Fresh kimchi

Because it’s eaten without fermentation, during which a natural sweetness develops, the addition of sugar or corn syrup (or Korean rice syrup) helps round out the flavor of geotjeori. In this recipe, I also used Korean plum syrup called maesil chung (매실청). You can simply omit it if you don’t have it, but it adds a natural fruity sweetness to the dish. Maesil chung is not an ingredient that I grew up with, but it has recently become a popular ingredient. 

I also added minari (water dropwort) and buchu (garlic chives) to this recipe for extra flavors. They are in season and available in Korean markets in my area. You can omit them if you can’t find them.

Fresh kimchi

All the tableware shown in the final photos of this post are sponsored by Huue Craft, an online store dedicated to the finest Korean pottery tableware. They ship worldwide to over 25 countries. Please visit Huue Craft online store and check out their beautiful tableware!

Fresh kimchi

 

Baechu Geotjeori (Fresh Kimchi)
Quick salad-like kimchi that's made to be eaten without fermentation
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 small (about 2.5 pounds) baechu, (napa cabbage)
  2. 3 tablespoons coarse sea salt (less if using finer salt)
  3. 2 scallions
  4. 2 ounces buchu (garlic chives), cut into 2-inch pieces - optional
  5. a few stalks minari (water dropwort), cut into 2-inch pieces - optional
Seasoning
  1. 4 tablespoons gochugaru, Korean red chili pepper flakes
  2. 3 tablespoons myulchi aekjeot, 멸치액젓 (fish sauce)
  3. 1 tablespoon corn syrup (or Korean rice syrup)
  4. 1 tablespoon maesil cheong, 매실청 (Korean plum syrup) - or a bit more corn syrup
  5. 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  6. 1 teaspoon finely grated ginger
  7. 1 teaspoon sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. Separate the cabbage leaves. Cut each leaf lengthwise, and then cut crosswise once or twice into long bite sizes. Rinse in water and drain.
    Baechu geotjeori
  2. Place a layer of cabbage in a large bowl and sprinkle with a tablespoon of salt. Repeat with the remaining cabbage and salt. Toss well to coat evenly. Leave it for 40 to 60 minutes until softened, tossing once halfway through.
    DSC_0867
  3. Roughly chop the scallions. Cut the optional minari and buchu into about 2-inch lengths. Combine all the seasoning ingredients in a small bowl, and mix well with 2 tablespoons of water.
    Fresh kimchi
  4. Rinse the cabbage twice and drain well.
    Fresh kimchi
  5. Add the seasoning mix to the cabbage. Using a kitchen glove, toss everything by hand until the cabbage pieces are well coated with the seasoning. Add the scallion, minari, and buchu. Add a little salt or more fish sauce to taste.
    Fresh Kimchi
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Tuna Gimbap http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/05/tuna-gimbap.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/05/tuna-gimbap.html#comments Mon, 18 May 2015 03:58:24 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3015 Here’s another gimbap (김밥) recipe! This time, it’s tuna gimbap made with canned tuna (chamchi, 참치, in Korean). In the past, I’ve posted classic gimbap, myulchu gimbap, and mini gimbap. The tuna filling is typically made similar to tuna salad with mayonnaise and other ingredients. I added a bit of dijon mustard, lemon juice, and diced celery. […]

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Chamchi gimbap

Here’s another gimbap (김밥) recipe! This time, it’s tuna gimbap made with canned tuna (chamchi, 참치, in Korean). In the past, I’ve posted classic gimbap, myulchu gimbap, and mini gimbap.

The tuna filling is typically made similar to tuna salad with mayonnaise and other ingredients. I added a bit of dijon mustard, lemon juice, and diced celery. You can also add a bit of diced onion if you want. Since it’s going inside the rice, you don’t want to make the tuna too watery. Hold back from using the amount of mayonnaise and other wet ingredients from your favorite tuna salad recipe. 

Chamchi gimbap

You can also add other typical gimbap ingredients such as egg, eomuk (fish cake), pickled radish, carrot, and/or spinach. In this recipe, I used romaine lettuce, perilla leaves (kkaennip), cucumbers, crab sticks, and pickled radish. The lettuce and perilla leaves wrap the tuna and other ingredients inside the roll, separating the wet ingredients from the rice. They also give a nice look when the roll is cut. I like the perilla scent in this gimbap, but if you can’t find it, simply use more lettuce.

Chamchi gimbap recipe

All the tableware shown in the final photos of this post are sponsored by Huue Craft, an online store dedicated to the finest Korean pottery tableware. They ship worldwide to over 25 countries. Visit their store at the Huue Craft online store.

Chamchi gimbap

tuna gimbap recipe

Tuna Gimbap
Serves 5
Gimbap (Korean seaweed rice rolls) made with canned tuna
Print
For the rice
  1. 2 cups (standard measuring cup not the cup that comes with a rice cooker) uncooked short grain rice
  2. 1-1/2 tablespoons sesame oil
  3. salt to taste (about 1/2 teaspoon)
For the tuna
  1. 2 cans (5 to 6 ounces) tuna, drained well
  2. 2 tablespoons finely diced celery
  3. 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  4. 1 teaspoon dijon mustard
  5. 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  6. salt (start with ¼ teaspoon) and pepper to taste
For the other ingredients
  1. 10 romaine lettuce leaves (only use green leafy part)
  2. 10 perilla leaves
  3. 3 kirby cucumbers, cut into thick sticks or julienned (do not used seedy part)
  4. 5 strips pre-cut pickled radish (단무지)
  5. 10 3-inch pieces imitation crab meat (crab sticks)
  6. 5 sheets gim
Instructions
  1. Cook the rice using a little less water than usual. (Fresh cooked rice is best for gimbap.)
  2. Drain the tuna well in a strainer. Press with a spoon to force more liquid to drain.
    chamchi gimbap recipe
  3. Mix well with the celery, mayonnaise, dijon mustard, and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
    chamchi gimbap recipe
  4. Prepare the other ingredients. Make sure the vegetables are dry. Pat the crab sticks and pickled radish with a paper towel to remove excess water.
    Chamchi gimbap recipe
  5. When all the other ingredients are ready, remove the rice from the rice cooker. While the rice is still hot, add the sesame oil and salt. Mix well by lightly folding with a rice paddle or large spoon until evenly seasoned. The rice will cool down during this process and be ready to be used.
    chamchi gimbap recipe
  6. Put a sheet of gim, shiny side down with the longer side toward you, on a cutting board or a bamboo mat if available. Spread about 3/4 of rice evenly over the gim using a rice paddle or preferably your fingers.
    chamchi gimbap
  7. Lay two lettuce leaves and two perilla leaves on top of the rice, close to you, and then the tuna and other prepared ingredients.
    chamchi gimbap
  8. Lift the entire bottom edge with both hands, and roll over the filling away from you, bringing it to the other end of rice and tucking in the filling with your fingers. Put firm pressure over the roll with the help of the bamboo mat, if using, to close everything in tightly. Then, continue to roll again, putting pressure evenly over the roll using both hands.
    chamchi gimbap
  9. Rub or brush the roll with a little bit of sesame oil for extra flavor and a shiny look. Apply a little bit of sesame oil to a sharp knife. This will keep rice from sticking to the knife. Repeat as necessary after each cut. Wipe the knife with a damp towel if the rice still sticks. Cut the roll into 1/2-inch bite sizes.
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Tteokgalbi (Korean Short Rib Patties) http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/05/tteokgalbi-korean-short-rib-patties.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/05/tteokgalbi-korean-short-rib-patties.html#comments Mon, 11 May 2015 03:59:38 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=3005 Today, I’m excited to feature very special pottery from Huue Craft Store. It was a pleasant surprise when I received an email from Mr. Choi, at Huue Craft, about sponsoring my blog with this beautiful tableware from Korea. I’ve always been interested in hand-made pottery, and often check out pottery showcases whenever I go to […]

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Korean short rib patties

Today, I’m excited to feature very special pottery from Huue Craft Store. It was a pleasant surprise when I received an email from Mr. Choi, at Huue Craft, about sponsoring my blog with this beautiful tableware from Korea. I’ve always been interested in hand-made pottery, and often check out pottery showcases whenever I go to Korea. Unfortunately, they are hard to bring over on the airplane.

Huue Craft Store is an online store dedicated to the finest Korean pottery tableware. Their work is renowned for its “understated elegance”. They don’t scream for attention or try to be trendy, but rather offer pleasing simplicity and timeless beauty in form and texture. All works are one-of-a-kind pieces, elaborately handcrafted by their five prominent potters from Korea. They ship worldwide to over 25 countries, via fast and low cost shipping, so please check them out at the Huue Craft Online Store.

Korean short rib patties

Now, let’s talk about today’s recipe. These fancy beef patties are called tteokgalbi (떡갈비), literally translated to rice cake ribs. Don’t expect any rice cakes (tteok, 떡) in the dish. The name comes from the way the minced meat is kneaded and shaped as rice cakes are made in Korea.

This dish hails from the royal court where the cooks minced the rib meat, for the King, for easy eating. Tteokgalbi later became a regional specialty of South Jeolla Province (전라남도). Nowadays, it’s popular all over the country. Every full course meal (hanjeongsik, 한정식) I had in Korea last year included a version of tteokgalbi, and there are many restaurants specializing in tteokgalbi all over Korea.

Tteokgalbi is made with ground beef short ribs. The meat is separated from the bones, finely minced, and then marinated. Traditionally, the marinated meat is attached back to the rib bones before being cooked. This not only gives the patties their identity of being short rib meat, but also adds a little extra flavor to the meat, but you can simply shape them like burger patties if you like.

Korean short rib patties

Beef short ribs are an expensive cut of meat, so you can substitute with beef chuck and/or brisket. The meat is traditionally hand-minced, but it’s a demanding job. If you don’t want to bother, use a meat grinder (or food processor) or ask your butcher to grind them for you. It will help if you slightly freeze the meat in small pieces before you use a meat grinder or food processor. You can also use high quality ground beef. It’s now very common in Korea to use ground beef (or pork, or a combination) to make tteokgalbi. These tasty, tender patties can be broiled, grilled or pan-fried. They will be excellent for your outdoor cooking this summer as well! 

Korean short rib patties

Tteokgalbi (Korean Short Rib Patties)
Serves 4
Delicious Korean beef patties made with short rib meat
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3 - 4 pounds beef short ribs (or 2 pounds beef chuck or brisket)
Marinade
  1. 4 tablespoons soy sauce
  2. 2 tablespoons sugar
  3. 2 tablespoons honey
  4. 2 tablespoons rice wine (or Mirin)
  5. 3 tablespoons grated Korean/Asian pear (or apple) grated
  6. 1/2 medium onion, finely chopped
  7. 3 scallions, finely chopped
  8. 2 tablespoons minced garlic
  9. 1 teaspoon minced ginger
  10. 1 tablespoons sesame oil
  11. 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  12. chopped pine nuts for garnish - optional
Instructions
  1. Trim excess fat. Remove the meat as much as possible from the bones. Keep the meat in the freezer for about an hour.
    Korean short rib patties
  2. Soak the ribs in cold water for 20 to 30 minutes to remove some blood. Drain.
    Korean short rib patties
  3. Grind the meat using a meat grinder or a food processor. If mincing by hand, thinly slice the meat, cut the slices into thin strips, and then cut crosswise into small pieces.
    tteokgalbi
  4. Mince the meat by rocking the blade back and forth into the smallest pieces.
    tteokgalbi
  5. Mix all marinade ingredients well.
    tteokgalbi
  6. Add the marinade to the meat, and then mix very well. Knead the meat until it becomes a bit sticky, 2 to 3 minutes. Marinate the meat for at least 2 hours (overnight for best results).
    ttokgalbi
  7. If using the rib bones, dredge the bone in flour.
    tteokgalbi
  8. Attach the meat to the bone in even thickness as you’re wrapping the bone with the meat. Press with your palms so the meat is tightly attached to the meat.
    tteokgalbi
  9. Otherwise, you can simply make round or oval patties.
    tteokgalbi
  10. Set the oven to broil and preheat. Lay the meat in a broil pan and place it on the top rack of the oven, usually about 6 inches below the broiler. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes. Carefully flip them over and cook for an additional 3 -4 minutes until nicely charred. You can also grill over a charcoal or gas grill. Grill over medium to medium high, turning only once, 2 – 3 minutes on each side.
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Mini Gimbap (Mayak Gimbap) http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/05/mini-gimbap-mayak-gimbap.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/05/mini-gimbap-mayak-gimbap.html#comments Sun, 03 May 2015 04:00:12 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=2975 This child-size gimbap (or kimbap) is called ggoma gimbap (꼬마김밥) because of its small size. Ggoma means a little one or little kid in Korean. It’s also known as mayak gimbap (마약김밥). Mayak means narcotic drugs, so the name comes from this gimbap’s reputation for being addictive. It’s a specialty of Gwangjang Market (광장시장), a […]

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Mayak kimbap

This child-size gimbap (or kimbap) is called ggoma gimbap (꼬마김밥) because of its small size. Ggoma means a little one or little kid in Korean. It’s also known as mayak gimbap (마약김밥). Mayak means narcotic drugs, so the name comes from this gimbap’s reputation for being addictive. It’s a specialty of Gwangjang Market (광장시장), a bustling, crowded market in the center city of Seoul, where the merchants came up with the idea to serve these little guys with a sweet and tangy hot mustard sauce. It’s this sauce that makes the gimbap addictive.

By the way, if you travel to Seoul, Gwangjang Market is a fun place to visit, which boasts, among other things, all sorts of street food. The market is a popular place for both locals and tourists.  

Gwangjang Shijang

Unlike traditional gimbap, this mini gimbap uses minimal ingredients, which takes no effort to roll up. The gimbap I tried in Gwangjang Market, during my trip last year, had only two ingredients in it — yellow pickled radish and carrot, but generously brushed with sesame oil. I used three ingredients here — pickled radish, carrot, and spinach. You can substitute julienned cucumber for spinach.

Mini gimbap

I am not sure what secret ingredients the merchants use for their mustard sauce, but a typical hot mustard sauce includes hot mustard called gyeoja (겨자), vinegar, soy sauce and sugar. Here, I tried it with dijon mustard and added finely ground sesame seeds for extra nutty flavor to pair with the sesame oil laden gimbap. It’s addictive!  

Mayak kimbap

Mini Gimbap (Mayak Gimbap)
Serves 2
Addictive mini gimbap (Korean seaweed rice rolls) with a mustard and sesame sauce
Print
Ingredients
  1. Makes 16 pieces
  2. 1-1/2 cups uncooked short grain rice (standard measuring cup not the cup that comes with a rice cooker)
  3. 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  4. salt to taste (start with 1/3 teaspoon)
  5. 1 small bunch spinach (about 6 ounces)
  6. 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  7. salt to taste – about 1/4 teaspoon
  8. 1 large carrot, julienned
  9. 4 yellow pickled radish (danmuji) strips, pre-cut for gimbap
  10. 4 gim (aka nori) sheets
Sauce
  1. 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, finely ground in a spice grinder or mortar bowl
  2. 1 tablespoon vinegar
  3. 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  4. 1 teaspoon dijon mustard (or Korean hot mustard, gyeoja)
  5. 1/8 teaspoon salt
  6. 2 teaspoons sugar
Instructions
  1. Cook the rice using a little less water than usual. (Fresh cooked rice is best for gimbap.)
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and prepare an ice bath. Blanch the spinach, place immediately in the ice bath, then squeeze the water out. Run a knife through the squeezed spinach a couple of times. Season with the sesame oil and salt.
    Mini gimbap
  3. Julienne the carrots. Heat a lightly oiled pan over medium high heat. Stir fry the carrots until slightly softened. Lightly season with a pinch of salt.
    Mayak Kimbap
  4. Cut the pickled radish crosswise in half, and then cut lengthwise in half.
    mini kimbap
  5. When all the ingredients are ready, remove the rice from the rice cooker. While the rice is still hot, add the sesame oil and salt. Mix well by lightly folding with a rice paddle or spoon until evenly seasoned.
    mayak kimbap
  6. Cut 4 sheets of gim into quarters.
    mini kimbap
  7. Put a quarter sheet of gim, shiny side down and shorter side toward you, on a cutting board. Spread 1 tablespoon to 1-1/2 tablespoons of rice evenly over the gim, leaving a little bit of space on the side away from you. Do this with your fingers. Keep wet towel and wipe your fingers frequently to keep the rice from sticking to your fingers. Lay the prepared ingredients on top of the rice, closer towards you.
    mayak kimbap
  8. Lift the entire bottom edge with both hands and roll over the filling away from you, tucking in the filling with your fingers.
    mayak kimbap
  9. Rub or brush the roll with a little bit of sesame oil for extra flavor and a shiny look.
    Mayak kimbap
For the sauce
  1. Finely grind the sesame seeds in a spice grinder or mortar bowl. Mix with the remaining sauce ingredients. Stir well until the sugar is dissolved and the ground sesame seeds are evenly distributed.
    Mayak gimbap sauce
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Seafood Doenjang Jjigae http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/04/seafood-doenjang-jjigae.html http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2015/04/seafood-doenjang-jjigae.html#comments Mon, 27 Apr 2015 03:59:37 +0000 http://www.koreanbapsang.com/?p=2913 It’s been over 5 years since I last posted a doenjang jjigae (된장찌개) recipe, which is a staple stew made with fermented soybean paste, doenjang. It was a very basic doenjang jjigae recipe, that I made with fatty pork, but a very popular one. Head over there if you like meat in your stew. This time, I […]

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Seafood doenjang jjigae

It’s been over 5 years since I last posted a doenjang jjigae (된장찌개) recipe, which is a staple stew made with fermented soybean paste, doenjang. It was a very basic doenjang jjigae recipe, that I made with fatty pork, but a very popular one. Head over there if you like meat in your stew. This time, I made a variation made with seafood.

Any type of seafood can be added. The typical additions are clams, mussels, shrimp, squid, and oysters. You can use any one of these or a combination.

The most important ingredient in doenjang jjigae is obviously doenjang. Doenjang is traditionally homemade, but most households buy commercially available doenjang these days. For many years, we were lucky enough to have doenjang that my mother-in-law made. It was the best doenjang! Now that she’s unable to make it, I usually resort to locally made home-style doenjang that’s sold at some Korean markets. If unavailable, I get one of the major brands.

seafood doenjang jjigae

We all know by now a good Korean stew requires anchovy broth, and it doesn’t take much time to make it. Make a habit of using anchovy broth in your stew. Dry anchovies last a long time in the freezer.

A small trick you can use for doenjang jjigae is to use a small amount of vinegar at the end. It will brighten the doenjang taste, making the stew even more delicious!

Seafood doenjang jjigae

Seafood Doenjang Jjigae
Serves 2
Doenjang jjigae (Korean soybean paste stew) made with seafood
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup assortment of seafood (I used a few small clams, 1/2 squid, and 5 medium shrimp)
  2. 8 to 10 ounces tofu
  3. 1/2 medium zucchini
  4. 3 to 4 mushroom caps
  5. 1/4 medium onion
  6. 3 ounces Korean radish (mu)
  7. 1 chili pepper (green or red)
  8. 1 to 2 scallions
  9. 2 tablespoons Korean soybean paste (doenjang)
  10. 1 teaspoon Korean chili pepper flakes (gochugaru)
  11. 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  12. 1 teaspoon vinegar
  13. 3 cups of anchovy broth or water (see note)
Instructions
  1. Rinse and scrub the clams. Place the clams in salted water (1 tablespoon of salt in 2 to 3 cups of water) for 30 minutes or longer to get the clams to spit out the sand. Clean the squid, and cut into bite size pieces. Clean the shrimp.
    Seafood doenjang jjigae
  2. Cut the tofu into 1/2-inch thick bite size slices. Cut the zucchini, onion, mushrooms, and radish into bite size pieces. Roughly chop the scallion.
    seafood doenjang jjigae
  3. Add the anchovy broth (or water) and soybean paste to a small pot. Stir well to dissolve the soy bean paste. Add the radish and onion. Bring it to a boil over medium high heat, and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
    Seafood doenjang jjigae
  4. Add the tofu, zucchini, mushroom, and chili pepper. Boil for an additional 2 minutes.
    Seafood doenjang jjigae
  5. Add the seafood, starting with the clams. Cook for another 2 to 3 minutes or until the clams are open. Stir in the vinegar, and throw in the scallion. Cook for another minute or two.
    Seafood doenjang jjigae
Notes
  1. Use the water used to rinse rice, ssal ddeum mul or anchovy broth for jjigae/stew. For anchovy broth, boil about 10 medium dry anchovies and one 3-inch square dried kelp in 4 cups of water for 10 minutes.
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