About


Hi! Welcome to Korean Bapsang (table)! My name is Hyosun Ro, and I am a Korean-American mom of two wonderful grown-up children. I am also a U.S. Government professional specializing in government contracting in Washington, DC. In the summer of 2009, I started this blog to compile recipes for the food that I have been cooking throughout my life. It all started with my children, who are now away from home, wanting to learn how to cook the food that they grew up with. They frequently call me around dinner time asking how to cook certain dishes. Both of them love to eat great food and enjoy cooking. They grew up immensely appreciating family tradition and cultural heritage through food.  
                 
Growing up in Korea, I always took great interests in my mother’s cooking. My mother is an excellent home cook and loves to cook for family and friends. When I was a newlywed, I recreated her dishes to feed my hungry husband. I then realized how much I had learned from my mother simply by watching and tasting her cooking. I soon had to start taking cooking seriously. My mother-in-law, as all Korean mother-in-laws of her generation do, expected me to produce a feast for every special occasion. I still remember my first big cooking event. It was my son’s 100th day after his birth (which is a big occasion for Koreans), and my parents-in-law invited everyone from their church. Since then, cooking became a big part of my life. I honed my cooking skills by hosting numerous gatherings for family and friends that always involved great food. The peak of my culinary adventure was my father-in-law’s  80th birthday a few years ago. It was a huge party, with about 100 people, and I made all the food at home. Through all these events, I became an enthusiastic home cook.   

This blog is the perfect outlet for my longtime passion for food. Through this blog, I hope to share the secrets of classic Korean home cooking and some of my other home favorites. As most Korean home cooks do, I have always cooked by instinct and eyeballing, so it is a little bit of a challenge to develop exact measurements and cooking times.  For this reason, I test all the recipes as many times as it takes to develop accurate recipes that are easy to follow and produce consistently quality results.  

I would love to see my passion for creating great recipes develop into a cookbook to be passed on to generations to come. With this goal in mind, I treat each recipe I post as a page in my future cookbook. So, I’d like to invite you to share the experience as I create one recipe at a time!

You can contact me at koreanbapsang@gmail.com.

108 comments:

  1. Hyosun Shi,
    I just stumbled upon your blog, you have done an excellent job!
    It is snowing outside in Seoul now and while going through your blog, my mouth is watering. I'm really feeling hungry in the middle of the night.
    Just love it!

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  2. Thanks for stopping by my blog. Great blog, and I love that you started it to share your meals with your children (and us!). Food is such a great way to appreciate a culture. There are so many great meals to explore on your blog... Thanks for sharing!

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  3. Love your blog. I love Korean food and will be visiting your blog regularly for tips on Korean food.

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  4. Hello:
    My husband is 1/2 Korean (I am Irish) but I love traditional Korean food and am learning hands on. I have a little Korean lady who has been able to give me some help here and there, but mainly I rely on cookbooks and blogs such as yours. I stumbled across it looking for Weight Watcher points for mandu (steamed). I love your blog and will use it in the future for my Korean cusine :) Thank you.
    Claire

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  5. So happy to meet you via Erica's Apricosa. Your site is wonderful! Looking forward to getting to know you better, Hyosun.

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  6. Hi Hyosun Ro,

    My name is Laura. I'm also a korean american mom. I live 20 mins east of Inner Harbor, Baltimore :) I was born in Korea and was adopted at the age of 6. I know very little about our culture and am now getting into Korean cooking. I know now why my favorite american dish is spaghetti :) I have 4 little kids who I'd love to share our culture with and so I was on a search to find a cooking blog to help me with some basic dished. Yours looked like a great place to start! I have to ask, do all korean dishes so high in sodium? My husband and I are changing our eating habits to go more organic and healthy and in the few dishes we've had, he noticed the sodium content. Just curious. Thanks for listening and sharing your love of cooking. I can't wait to get started!

    Blessings to you,
    Laura

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  7. Laura - It's great that you want to learn Korean food and culture that you did not grow up with to share with your children. And thanks for choosing my blog to start with. I would be more than happy to help you out. Regarding your concern on sodium, some dishes tend to have more than others. But you can adjust the sodium level to your liking with most of the dishes. Enjoy cooking Korean!

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  8. I have really enjoyed this page. My wife is Korean so for me to get these receipes and fix a dish for her has been fun. We have been married for 37 yrs. Do you have a reseioe for Korean Style Sweet and sour pork?

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  9. Ben - Thank you for your readership! Wow 37 years - congratulations!! Korean style sweet and sour pork (tangsuyuk) certainly is on my list of things to do. I will try to move it up for you.

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  10. Your website makes me hungry :) I'm half-korean and really appreciate the way you lay out each recipe, etc. My brother and I do not read or speak korean and often will forget the names of dishes and have to call our mom. I'm going to be able to cook so many more korean dishes now! Thank you!

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  11. Tiffany - Thank you for visiting and leaving the nice comments. I hope to hear from you about your future Korean cooking.

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  12. Hyosun shi,

    You are right down the street from me! I grew up thinking that the way my family made Korean food was how it was in every other household, but lo and behold, so many variations. LOVE surfing Korean cooking blogs and seeing the recipes everyone else grew up with.

    Because of my living situation, I can't make my favorite breakfast (dwenjang guk, godeunguh, bap, gim, kimchi...). Do you know any restaurants that serve this in the area? I'm from the West Coast and haven't found anything so far here :(.

    LOVE your blog, thanks for cooking!
    Linda

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  13. Hi Linda - Thanks for visiting my blog. Glad to hear we are neighbors. Please e-mail me at eatingandliving@gmail.com. I will give you the information on Korean restaurants and markets. Look forward to talking to you soon.

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  14. I made the tangsuyuk for the wife and she was really surprised ! Since I found this blog it has been so much fun to surprise her with her style of comfort food. I did use beef for hers pork for mine. Thanks we are having fun. She is trying hard to find out how I'm comming up with these dinners! LOL thanks again

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  15. Ben - Thanks! I am so happy to hear you are able to surprise your wife with Korean meals using my blog. Your wife is one lucky lady. Cheers!

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  16. This is my first visit to your blog. It's wonderful. I'm inspired to try some of your recipes! Thank you!

    http://dvfood.blogspot.com/

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  17. Although I grew up in a Korean household, my mom never really taught me how to cook traditional food! Thanks for putting up these recipes so when I miss my mom's home cooking I won't have to go to the nearest Korean restaurant.

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  18. Thank you, Anonymous! Please let me know if you have any questions about any of my recipes or any other Korean food.

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  19. Hello! My mother is Korean and I LOVE her Korean cooking but unfortunately didn't learn how to make any of it. I am so excited to find your website so I can start trying to cook on my own!! Kam sa ham nee da!

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  20. Adriane - Thank you! I am glad that you will use my recipes to recreate your mom's cooking. Look forward to hearing more about it. Happy cooking!

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  21. Pauline Wan, SingaporeOctober 28, 2011

    Dear Hyosun Ro,

    I've just returned from a holiday in Korea and bravely packed my luggage with foodstuff and recipe books to cook back here. Then I realized the ingredients and measurements in the cookbooks are not exactly conventional. Understandably, its not easy to translate the complex steps & ingredients. I got stuck at the first few steps starting with anchovy stock!Fortunately I found your site. As I'm typing, my stock is boiling on the stove. Thanks for sharing your recipes and tips. They are very helpful. I'm discovering the wisdom of Korean cuisine through cooking and can't wait to try more! Hwaiting!

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  22. Pauline - Hope you had a great time in Korea. The food there is amazing, isn't it? I am thrilled to hear my site is helpful to you and look forward to hearing more about your cooking Korean. Thanks!

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  23. Hi Mrs. Ro!

    Just wanted to let you know that I've been following your blog ever since Michelle shared it with me. I'll be moving into an apartment with a kitchen soon, and I'm so, so excited to play with your recipes.

    Thank you so much for sharing! xo

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  24. Sooji - So happy to hear from you! Look forward to hearing about your cooking. Enjoy! And best wishes!!

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  25. Hi Mrs. Ro...I've been following your blog for a few months, now, and have been meaning to leave a note and haven't til now! Long story short, my mom is a wonderful cook, so by taste/memory, I know all the ingredients, but often need(ed) to call her to confirm measurements and proportions. I'd looked up other blogs here & there, but even at a glance, I'd always catch something not-quite-right about a recipe or procedure. Anyhow, yours is the first that I've found is consistently virtually identical to my mom's cooking...so your blog is the only one I reference for ideas for tonight's dinner and the only one I trust to taste the "way it's supposed to" :) This means bugging my mom with far fewer 30-second phone calls to mom to confirm teaspoon or tablespoon of this or that! THANK YOU!

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  26. Thank you, Amy! What a compliment! I am so happy to hear you use my recipes to recreate your mom's cooking. But I am sure your mom loves frequent phone calls from you, so hope you find some other reasons to call your mom as often. Tell mom I said hi too!

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  27. Hi Hyosun! I just found your blog through foodgawker. I'm half-Korean (my mom is Korean) and my husband & I absolutely love Korean food. I know how to make some of the easier dishes, but have been wanting to expand my Korean recipes to share with my husband. I am so excited to have found you... there are so many of your recipes I cannot wait to try out! Thank you!

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  28. Nicole - Welcome to my blog, and thank you very much for finding me! Look forward to hearing more about your Korean cooking. Happy cooking!

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  29. Mrs. Hyosun Ro,
    Your family are blessed to have such an amazing person as yourself! You are very generous for sharing all your wonderful, AUTHENTIC, INSANELY delicious recipes. I've tried many websites to look for authentic Korean recipes, and they're just not as good as yours!!! I hope you do get your works published because you are one AMAZING cook!! Best wishes and happy holidays to you!

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  30. Thank you, Anonymous, for your incredibly kind and encouraging words! Happy holidays to you too!

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  31. Hi, I usually never comment on food blogs but I simply could not resist yours! I'm an American Chinese-Korean who wants to reconnect with my heritage via cooking. I know authentic Korean food when I see it and your blog has all the goods! I really appreciate you taking the take and sharing your delicious recipes with the world. It means a lot to me to be able to cook the dishes I had when I was a child. Thank you!!! - Joanne

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  32. Joanne - Thank you so much for such nice words! You just put a BIG smile on my face. I am so happy to hear you can cook the dishes you grew up with using my recipes. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers!

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  33. Thank you for sharing your terrific recipes. I am Taiwanese-American married to a Korean man. I love Korean food and am so happy to see a blog that does justice to the cuisine. Keep up the fantastic work. You are inspiring others and keeping traditions alive.

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    1. Slee - Thank you so much for such encouraging words! Happy cooking!

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  34. Mrs. Ro-
    I just stumbled across your blog through foodgawker.com..
    I am a Korean-American myself, almost 18, ready to go to college soon. I was born in Korea but raised in NJ since 8. For ten years, I would struggle through the cultural differences and both my two sisters and I would give my mother a hard time especially about food.. My mother always wanted the best for us, and to fit to our changes, would try to prepare some snacks (more like meals..) after school. But my two sisters and I, would always complain that she would make us the same boring Korean food all the time. But now that I'm almost ready to live by myself, I wanted to start acting more maturely and start preparing some meals for my mother instead of expecting and taking things granted from her..
    Now, when I came across your blog, I was really excited to see all the food that I grew up with, with VERY CLEAR instructions and pictures (I'm a visual learner ;;) My dad's 50th birthday is this coming Tuesday, and I was going to prepare some of his favorite Korean dishes myself. And you have NO idea, how GLAD , VERY VERY GLAD I found your blog; or else I would've drowned in confusion...

    So, I just wanted to say THANK YOU SO MUCH♡:-)
    ^pointless ramblings.. sorry lol.
    ♡LOVE.

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    1. Thank you, Anonymous! Pointless ramblings? I must tell you. I opened your e-mail the first thing this morning before leaving for work. It truly made my day! Your parents are very lucky to have you as their daughter, and I must tell you it seems like they did a wonderful job raising you as well. Hope your cooking for dad's birthday goes well. Wish him happy birthday for me.

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  35. Really inspiring blog you got there. I will give your recipes a try now that korean ingredients can easily be found in local asian super market in my town. I have met many koreans when traveling in asia and australia. Koreans often strike me as warm, friendly and polite human beings. As a western guy there is certainly a challenge to cook these dishes. But with the right passion and dedication it will all be fine.

    haha. I remember my first encounter with korean food. It was this sweet older korean couple who was having a little sushi and korean food cafe in Czech republic. I ordered Yae yook bokum. This little guy warned me saying "This is spicy". I tried to man up and what happens? I start sweating like crazy, and his wife comes running with cold water melon laughing really loud. Sweet friendly couple.

    Since that day, i couldn't resist korean food.

    Hope to see more lovely recipes from you in the near future:).

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    1. Thank you, Simon! Finding ingredients is the half the battle outside Korea. Some of us are luckier than others since we have Korean markets nearby. Hope you find some recipes that you feel comfortable to start with. Was that in Prague? Someone who used to work with me went to Prague and discovered Korean food as well. How interesting! Cheers!

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  36. Hello,

    Your blog is lovely. I got almost teary eyed looking through some of your photos, so reminiscent of food my mom used to make. She's no longer here to make me the food I love so much. I've been trying to learn how to make some myself, but they really aren't the same. I wish I had recipes to reference of how my mom made them since there's always some variation. Your children are a lucky to have a written reference to look back on over time.

    Soyon

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    1. Soyon - I am sorry to hear about your mom. No one can make food better than our moms because there is one critical ingredient missing - her love. I still hope my recipes will help you recreate your mom's food as close as possible. Thank you so much for visiting and letting me know how you feel about my blog!

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  37. Hello, I was really very excited to know that you and I live in the Washington DC area. I was exposed to Korean cuisine through some of my coworkers that would take me to a few Korean Restaurants in the Laurel, Maryland area. As a black women I've come to not only appreciate the Korean culture from what I've seen from the Kimchi Chronicles program on PBS but also the food as well. The spices and seasonings used in the foods are amazing and I've been wanting to learn how to cook some of the dishes at home my self.

    I'm really excited to see the recipe for Jjambbong Seafood Stew, I hope to make it this weekend if the weather isn't too bad.

    Also would you consider offering a Korean cooking class? There's so much I would like to ask concerning some of the cooking methods used for some of the stews and salads.

    Once again, thanks for the recipes...keep them coming!

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    1. Hi Kimberly! Great to hear you are in the DC area too. I am in Fairfax County. I like Kimchi Chronicles as well. It is an excellent program for Korean culture and food. Hope you get to make jjambbong this weekend. Let me know how it turns out. Also, you can e-mail me with any questions you have at eatingandliving@gmail.com. Thank you and happy cooking!

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  38. Hyosun Ro:

    Since I'm european and Prague is my favorite city so far in Europe, I've been there a few times. There used to be a place named Manna Sushi and korean food, but last time i went there summer 2011 Manna had changed ownership. Now there was only sushi which was closed most of the time.

    However, there is a restaurant there named Korea House which has everything authentic. They imported their grills from Korea, and they also had several types of authentic kimchi included in the meals.

    Kitchen staff is korean, and ownership is korean. But polite waiter from Bangladesh was serving me for the evening. I ordered Samgyeopsal for the evening. Since I had only 4 days available, it was the last night of my trip.

    They also had a shop there named Arirang which i paid a visit to. They had lots of korean ingredients. It's lovely to see how a former soviet continent now have developed into one of europe's best treasures.

    Korea house Is located close to a street named Legerova:).

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    1. Thank you, Simon! It's great to hear there is an authentic Korean restaurant in Prague. I should definitely remember this for my next trip to Prague. Cheers!

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  39. Hello.

    I live in the Washington D.C. area and i stumbled across your blog looking for recipes that i can cook for my father while my mom is in korea on vacation. My father (like most korean fathers) is a stubborn man when it comes to food and i WAS nervous about having to cook for him but your blog is very comforting with its step-by-step instructions.

    I've moved out of my parents house a couple years ago and since have found it difficult to find the ingredients necessary to cook an authentic korean food. I go to two different local korean stores: Lotte in Fairfax, Grandmart in Annandale.

    I would love to hear about where you shop and eat korean food in this area for some insight!

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    1. Thank you, anonymous! Please e-mail me at eatingandliving@gmail.com.

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  40. Hi Mrs. Ro!

    This is my first time leaving a comment on a food blog. Just wanted to encourage and thank you for sharing all your recipes with us! I just moved away from family with my husband & 11month baby and the biggest challenge of transitioning into a full-time mom has been cooking. Its definitely an area I'm still trying to grow in but your recipes have been helping me so much. I'm sure my husband thanks you too! :)

    I had a question- do you have recommendations of what to make for babies? I tried making moo-guk this week but any other soups/dishes you would recommend would be so helpful. I'm trying to make most of his meals at home.

    Thank you!

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    1. Hi Younghae - Thanks for leaving me the nice words. I am so happy to hear my recipes have been helpful. For your baby, how about juk? I have chicken, turkey and hobak juk recipes on this blog, but you can use the same methods to make other variations with different meat and vegetables. Also, I think gyeranjjim, mandu, and miyeok guk will be good. Of course, you will need to finely chop miyeok for the baby. Hope this helps!

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  41. My favorite local Korean restaurant just shut down (Do Sirak on 13th St. in Manhattan). None of the other nearby Korean places were nearly as good.

    Your site has bailed me out by teaching me how to make my two favorite dishes from the restaurant, Jeyuk Boekkum and Beef Bulgogi lettuce wraps.

    They actually came out better than the restaurant versions on my first try. I made the Jeyuk exactly as specified and the Bulgogi almost exactly as specified, so I think you get most of the credit here for writing incredibly clear recipes.

    For the bulgogi, I wound up using sake instead of mirin (I was going to adjust sweetness to taste anyway). Is honey traditional here? And should I be using plain white sugar? It worked very well, so no complaints.

    I had a very nicely marbled ribeye steak that I slightly froze and managed to slice reasonably uniformly (but not as uniform as the store-bought slices -- they must use deli meat slicers). As a result, a couple of pieces were very rare compared to the others after they came off the very hot fire (and hence looked much more blacked in spots than your picture above).

    I wound up threading the marinated beef slices onto skeweres to cook on our Weber grill over charcoal (my wife does all our grilling -- she's much better at it than me). I was surprised the marinated scallions grilled up in roughly the same time. They were great as a side. I didn't use the onions since I didn't know how to grill them;I suppose I could've used quarters.)

    Served it with rice and lettuce leaves and a bit of gokuchang on the side. Speaking of which, do you have a gokuchang recommendation? Our local Korean market has a half dozen brands to choose from. My wife found the medium strength one a bit too hot, but it's perfect for me.

    - Bob Carpenter
    Columbia Uni., Dept. of Statistics

    P.S. Great photos. My wife and I both used to do semi-professional food photography for the James Beard Foundation (which is two blocks from our house).

    P.P.S. And speaking of books, my Korean-American officemate and foody couldn't recommend a Korean cookbook written in English, so there's probably a market out there.

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  42. My husband and I love Korean food and we are both Russians ;-) When we dated we used to frequent local Korean eatery in my future husband's neighborhood in Cambridge, MA. He would also shop at the tiny Korean food store that had the best marinated crabs and other Korean delicacies. My husband was heart broken when the store closed. I'm so happy I found your blog! I'll be a frequent visitor! We can get ingredients from H-Mart Korean supermarket.

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    1. Thank you, Spymom! Marinated crabs are my favorite too (both spicy and non-spicy). One of my brothers live in the Boston area, and he and his wife were extremely happy when H-Mart opened there. Thanks for visiting! I look forward to many more of your visits.

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  43. Ms PiggyMay 27, 2012

    Dear Mrs Ro,

    I've stumble upon your blog by chance as I was looking for Ojungo Bukkom recipe and I'm so glad I found yours :) I'm a big fan of Korean cooking and have been trailing the internet for recipes, I've even just made my 3rd batch of Kimchi today.

    There's 2 particular dish which is dear to my heart and I've yet found the recipe for and they are 'Altang' and 'Yanggukjang' (not too sure if I've spelled it right but its actually stir fry beef tribe and pig intestine with perilla leafs and vegetables. And if its not too much to ask, would you be able to do a post for these two dishes?

    I would love to cook these 2 dishes for my wedding anniversary end of next month. Thank you again.

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    1. Hi Ms. Piggy - You make kimchi? That's nice! I love altang, but it's hard to find good fish eggs around here to make it at home. Hmm I am not sure what the other one is. Where did you have that dish?

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  44. AnonymousJuly 19, 2012

    Hello gud day,my name is hally from nigeria my attention was drawn to korean food and language through a korean film tittle JEWEL IN THE PAlACE. I will like to learn how to cook korean food i will be glad if u can be of help

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  45. I love your blog! Your recipes are so good. Do you happen to have a recipe for homemade noodles ( kook soo)? If you do I would love to see a post. Thanks, Sara

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    1. Sara - Thank you for the nice words. I've been thinking about doing a post on homemade kalguksu for a while. So stay tuned!

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  46. 안녕하세요.

    I live in Apple Valley, CA and in the process of opening a cooking class. After cooking for almost 30 years I wanted to share our wonderful Korean food with others and as you have mentioned pass it down to my kids(have 5). Your blog is very helpful because we all Korean 아줌마들 never write down any recipes.
    Maybe we can share some of the recipes of our own.

    감사합니다 for all your effort.

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    1. Thank you, Young! You're starting a cooking class? How awesome is that! And you do that with 5 children. That's totally incredible. I'd love to hear more about your class and recipes. Thanks for stopping by!

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  47. Hello,

    I am supposed to do "Korean" cooking with my six year old's class at school ... but stumped as to what to make? Any suggestions?

    I was thinking Mundu without Kimchi ...

    Cheers Arreum

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    1. Mandu sounds good. Gimbap will be fun too. http://eatingandliving.blogspot.com/2012/04/gimbapkimbap-korean-dried-seaweed-rolls.html

      Cheers to you and your child!

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  48. Great blog and great recipes....learned a lot about Korean culinary / food...

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  49. Hi, stumbled upon your blog. Live down the street in Chantilly. Definitely going to try your cucumber recipe. Been driving to Lighthouse in Centreville and buying theirs. Thanks!

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  50. Hello, I wondered if you might write a post on how to coordinate the preparation of soup and banchan for meals? My goal is to reach the point where our meals can return to being traditional (I really miss it). I thought perhaps all banchan is made on the weekend but realized it probably depends...ah well...would love to know how you approach this.
    Thanks in advance!!!

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  51. Hyun Suk KimSeptember 14, 2012

    Hello? I'm Hyun Suk with VOA. It was very nice meeting you at the Kimchi Conference yesterday.Your blog is AWESOME! I should visit here everyday. :) Thank you for sharing your precious recipes and 엄마 손맛!.

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  52. Hyosun Ro, it is such a pleasure to stumble upon your site. It is beautiful! Have you ever considered self publishing your cookbook. I am a stay-at-home multiracial mom, not Korean. I WISH I was Korean. I keep getting asked by Asian people if I am which is confusing since my skin is caramel shading. I always thought Asian people are light ( sorry, I hope that I have not offended you or anyone). I love the people, the culture, the entertainment industry, the fashion and the food. I would love to go see this beautiful country some day. The only thing is I have been vegan now for 8 years and going through as many recipes as I can to create vegan versions of them. Min you, I am teaching myself how to make classic Korean dishes that the home cook makes for my daughter and myself. I don't have a Korean mom, Korean mother-in-law or Korean Aunt to show me the ropes when it comes to Korean cooking.

    My food philosophy is and has always been - FOOD IS MEDICINE THROUGH BALANCE. I am learning that that is the Korean way as well. I'm beginning to wonder if I am Korean, :) after all. Your site is beautiful. Good luck on making your dreams come true on the creation of your very own cookbook. I know you will get there one day.

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  53. you dont even understand what you've done for me! my mom is always great about making my fave food but never waking me up early enough to see how it is made, she just won't share-so thanks mom#2!:OD -Jennifer

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    1. Jennifer - I don't think you understand what your sweet comment did for me in this first morning of the New Year. Deeply touched! And a big smile on my face! Thank you! Happy New Year!

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  54. I.LOOOVE.THIS.BLOG!!! I came upon it by chance when i googled "Kalbi Jjjim." And i made it for my husband and it tasted PERFECT! I'm Korean-American and grew up cooking all of these same traditional Korean dishes in the kitchen with my mother. My husband, who is Chinese, loves Korean food more than I do, but I never cooked for him because I didn't know the recipes! Now I can cook tons of yummy Korean favorites for him, and hopefully for my parents too! THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU! Your recipes are easy, the layout and directions thoughtful, and the photography is food-magazine gorgeous! I can't believe this is a side-hobby for you, and not a full-time job. Much love and respect! Sandy Hah

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    1. Hi Sandy - Thank you so much for such encouraging and supportive words! I'm very happy to hear you can cook the food you grew up with using my recipes. Yes, this blog takes a lot of my nights and weekends, and honestly it gets tiring at times. But, it's the readers like you who keeps me going! Totally worth my time!!

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  55. Hi Mrs. Ro,
    Thank you for taking the time to compile/write/create/share such wonderful recipes, especially in regards to taking the time to take photos, demonstrating how each step is done! That must have been time-consuming, but super-considerate and thoughtful, especially for someone like me who needs to follow instructions to a T. Thank you so much! :) Your site has become one of my go-to/reference sites when it comes to whipping up some delicious Korean foods.

    I was wondering, if you had any recommendations as to how to go about constructing a sweet potato cake, especially in regards to making the filling?

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    1. So happy to hear my site is your go-to place for Korean cooking! Yes, it's time consuming, but because of readers like you it's all well worth it! Thank you so much!

      I've made a sweet potato cake on two occasions, once for my niece's birthday and the other for my father's. They were good, but honestly I don't remember how I made it. It's been a while. I think I mixed steamed sweet potatoes with either heavy cream or whipped cream along with some sugar of course. I know this is not helping much. I hope to develop a recipe soon. My niece's been asking for a recipe for a while too.

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  56. Hyosun Ro,
    I am half-korean and grew up eating many of the wonderful dishes my mother made. I can cook some of the more popular dishes but didn't learn all of my favorites. My mother passed away last year and I realize how many of her recipes I don't know how to make. In addition to missing her very much, I miss my korean comfort foods. I am so happy to find your site! When I eat kimchi, my children (who eat it too), say it reminds them of their grandmothers home. I hope to learn from you so I can pass on some more korean recipes to my children. Thank you. Janice

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    1. Hi Janice - I'm so sorry to hear about your mother. It sounds like your children have great memories of her. I'm happy to help you with your Korean cooking. Thank you so much for stopping by!

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  57. Hello Hyosun Ro!
    My name is Joo Hi. I am half korean. My mother and father met when he was in the Army and stationed in Korea. She came to the US shortly after she found out she was pregnant with me. She never taught me Korean, but did expose me to the joys of Korean cuisine!
    My mom and I live a few hours away from each other, both too busy to make the trips. My tummy still misses her hot bibimbop, bulgogi, and other tasty treats. Im so glad I found your site! I look forward to re-creating traditional korean food from your blog. Being a mother of three, I hope to be able to install the same memories my mother gave to me - whether it be singing ''San Toki'' at bedtime, or letting them eat the slices of kimbap as they come off the cutting board. Thank you so much for taking the time to teach all of us the joys of cooking Korean! :D

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    1. Hi Joo Hi - Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing your story. It sounds like you have a great mom, and you're as great. I'm so proud of you that you want to install the same memories and recreate the food that you grew up with for your children. I feel honored to be a small part of it! Cheers!

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  58. I love your blog's name. I think your blog is so entertaining and informative. I've started my Koreananju blog recentely. I think your food as well your articles are fantastic especailly the international kimchi conference. I wish that one day the Kimchi conference will be held in Cambridge(UK).Thanks for sharing

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  59. Hello Mrs. Hyosun Ro!
    My name is Insa. I found your blog accidentally when I'm looking for recipes on Korean Cuisines. I love cooking, eating Korean food and try to make Kimchi myself. In Malaysia, we don't have a "pure" chili flakes; always mixing with other stuff. When I added it into my Kimchi, it tasted weird. To get imported Korean Chili flakes is expansive for me. So I just mixing the dried chili and added into Kimchi. Though, the taste is just fine, not so awesome like the original one. I hope to get some advise from your experience!

    Thank you very much!

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    1. There's really no substitute for good Korean chili pepper flakes if you want to make authentic kimchi. Good Korean chili pepper flakes are not cheap even in Korea, but it makes a big difference in kimchi taste. Thank you!

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  60. Mrs. Ro,
    Thank you so very much for your blog and they time you have taken to share your expertise in the preparation of the Korean table. I have been reading it for the past 2 hours and growing more and more hungry. My partner and I cook non-stop, and we are CRAZY for the tastes of Korea, but have always been intimidated to try making anything. Thank you in advance, we will use your blog as a beginner's guide to making our favorite Korean dishes. First up...your Cabbage Kimchi recipe. We can't wait !! Thanks so much again.

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    1. Adrian - Thank you so very much for choosing my blog to cook your favorite Korean dishes. Let me know if you have any questions along the way. Hope your kimchi turns out great. Happy cooking!

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  61. Hello! Thank you so much for your wonderful blog and awesome recipes! I can't wait to try it out!! I especially love your wonderful photos. Thank you, thank you!

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    1. Thank you so much for the kind words! Enjoy cooking Korean.

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  62. Awesome blog!!! After browsing your recipes, I now wanna go to a Korean store to buy ingredients. My favorite Korean dish is samgyupsal and I can't wait to make my own at home. Thank you for sharing your knowledge in Korean dishes.

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    1. Thank you, Kristine! It's my great pleasure to share. Samgyupsal is so good. It's easy to make at home. Once you make it at home once, it will be hard to order at restaurants. Cheers!

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  63. I can't wait to start working our way through your recipes! We just made your recipe for Gungjung Tteokbokki last night, as we just happened to run across the rice cakes at an asian market and decided to buy them (we've had the spicy Tteokbokki at a restaurant before), and I'm thinking about making the pickled garlic this weekend (at least, starting it). We've been very into Japanese cooking for a couple of years now, and we've always loved Korean food and have been making our own Napa Cabbage kimchi for a couple of years as well, so we're excited to dig deeper into Korean cuisine. Thanks so much for sharing your recipes!

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    1. Hi Dave - I know I'm very late with this response, but hope you still get to read it. I've been so busy this summer with all sorts of things. If you make your own kimchi, everything else will be very easy for you. Hope your pickled garlic turned out well. Thanks for using my recipes to dig deeper into Korean cuisine! Happy Korean cooking!

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  64. Hyosun, I'm thrilled to have found your website. I'm an American married to a Korean and we live in America. I don't speak Korean (but want to), and it's a challenge to make a meal because most recipes are in Korean and, of course, my in-laws don't measure anything - they just know how to make it all! I'm excited to try your recipes and appreciate the time you've taken to assemble them.

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    1. Hi Alycia - Welcome to Korean Bapsang! It's very nice to meet you here on my blog. I'm also happy to hear you will try my recipes to learn how to cook Korean food. Please let me know if you have any questions. Happy Korean cooking!

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  65. Hi Hyosun. I came across your site on rasa malaysia's blog. Thank you for sharing your recipes. They look simply delicious. Can you also share the famous Korean ginseng chicken in your blog pls? I love that so much.

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    1. Thank you so much! Yes, I hope to post a samgyetang recipe soon.
      In the mean time, how about this similar recipe without ginseng: http://www.koreanbapsang.com/2011/08/dak-gomtang-korean-chicken-soup.html#.Ulybd1Ckoy4

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  66. i LOVE this blog! i JUST found it and have already tried your dengjang guk. sooo good. do you have your own recipe for omurice? i just wanted to know if you cooked it differently? i have 2 young children 5 under so am looking for a lot of different ways to cook korean food. i was happy to see that you had a dduk guk recipe. i found a few online but none that i loved. can you also do one on sujebi? please!!! i tried and my sujebi came out thick and tasteless. just the broth was good. i cannot wait to try your other recipes!

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    1. Welcome, Susan! I'm glad to hear you liked my doenjang guk. All those dishes are on my list to do. Hope to get to them soon. Thank you so much for your blog love! Happy cooking!

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  67. I have only just discovered your blog. I am really enjoying reading it and am very keen to give your pickled garlic recipe a go. I was actually looking for recipes to help me to make Korean fermented garlic. Do you happen to have a recipe. I understand that you need to put the garlic in a sealed jar and ferment it at low temperature for a number of days. I have been unable to find an indication of temperature and time. Are you able to help? Cathy

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    1. Cathy - I'm so glad you've found my blog. Pickled garlic is great! Hmm I'm afraid I'm not able to help you with fermented garlic. I've never made it. Sorry! If you figure it out, let me know. Thanks for stopping by!

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  68. Wow, awesome recipes! My wife is Korean American and cannot cook (she can boil water OK, but that's about it, LOL)! Now I can step in and make the types of foods we spend a fortune on in restaurants and eat at home! Thanks!

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    1. Ken - Welcome to Korean Bapsang! And thank you! Yes, you can make good Korean food at home with my recipes. I know your wife will be impressed. Happy Korean cooking!

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  69. Hello!
    I'm Korean American and from the Northern Virginia area. I would like to thank you for your cooking blog. My mom and I have a language barrier so it's difficult to learn how to cook korean food. So when I discovered your blog last year, I was very pleased to find authentic and fantastic recipes!

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    1. Hi Nicole! Thanks for your kind words. I'm very happy to be helpful. Good to know you're in the area. Hopefully we will do a meet-up with the readers in the area one day. That would be awesome. Cheers!

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  70. Hi Hyosun- I must compliment you on the website. I tried the Pork Ribs kalbi recipe for Super Bowl Sunday and they were a hit from both Korean/non-Koreans. I'm also going to try your other recipes. My mom keeps no measurements, so when I try to follow her advice, my dishes have turned out off. I'm following your recipes, so keep 'em coming! :)

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    1. Thank you! I'm glad to hear your pork ribs were a hit. That's how I used to cook before this blog. Let me know how other recipes turn out for you. Happy Korean cooking!

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  71. I'm so glad to have come across your site! I have some many different 반찬 recipes to try!!!

    One question, though. I haven't explored your site too long, but I can't seem to find any recipes involving 총각김치. I have a huge jar of it sitting in my fridge, so I've been looking for creative ways to use it in making other dishes. Are there any links in the archives you could suggest?

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    1. Thank you for stopping by! You can chop them up and make kimchi fried rice, kimchi bibim guksu or kimchi kongnamul guk (or omit kongnamul and make kimchi guk). I also make kimchi jjigae with chonggak kimchi as well. You can find all these recipes on the blog by using the search box on the right hand side of the blog. Enjoy!

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  72. Sarah SongMarch 18, 2014

    I just came across your blog and I am going to bookmark it as my go-to Korean recipe site! My husband is Korean and I love Korean food so I am always looking for recipes that are easy to follow with clear directions and measurements... yours are by far the best! I am so excited to get in the kitchen and start cooking :)

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    1. Hi Sarah - Welcome to Korean Bapsang!! I am so happy to have you here. And thank you so much for such kind words! I hope you and your husband enjoy many Korean dishes through my recipes. Please let me know if you run into any questions or problems. Cheers!!

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  73. Hello! I just found your blog on Foodgawker. You have many delicious looking dishes! I just had to stop by. The story about your kids calling mom to learn how to make dishes over the phone reminds me of the first time I left home to live on my own. The only thing I knew how to make was ramen. The first few months, I survived on ramen, microwavable rice, store bought banchan, and the banchan our housekeeper made and packed for me when visiting home. And I would often find myself calling my mom (even though she is a terrible cook) to ask how to make so and so, and then adjust it to my taste.

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  74. THANKYOU SO MUCH GAM SA HAM NEE DAH! Your website was the best source i could have used for my communication project i basically built it off ur post on how to make kimchi (no plagerizing of course) and now i am not gona cry and think about dropping out! NAMASTE! plus i really like your blog its cool keep doing you ah ju ma - mucho love from a stranger

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  75. I am so glad to have found your blog! Your recipes look amazing. I am definitely going to be wandering about on your blog, looking for recipes to try out. Thank you for sharing.

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